Rich Clark Marketing

Opinions from Rich Clark one of the UK's leading Marketing Professionals


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5 F’s of Social Media

5 F’s of Social Media

Over a few posts I will highlight a number of case studies highlighting examples where brands have successfully implemented a social media concept.  To help illustrate the cases I may also identify a couple of the social media disasters.  A great recent example is the DSGi Facebook group where employees openly criticised customers.

However in this post I would like to highlight something that I call the 5 F’s of social media.  Don’t worry I’m not going to teach 5 new profanities beginning with the letter F.  Us marketeers like simple number-letter concepts to help add context to a piece of theory (4 P’s of Marketing).  This will also help me frame the case studies in future posts.

My 5 F’s theory does exactly that.  It highlights 5 distinct criteria – that if all are met, I believe most social media campaigns or activity will succeed.  Each campaign doesn’t necessarily have to hit all the buttons and success could also be achieved by simply turning up the volume on one or two of the areas.

Familiarity

To make any social media/participative marketing campaign a success brands really need to understand their target audience and the objectives of engaging with them.  If you can really get to grips with who your audience is and what they want then you will gain a genuine connection.  With this connection the community or audience should do your work for you, participate and  help towards growing the campaign.Pepsi Amp App

The best method to underline the importance of this particular F is when people get it wrong.  Pepsi’s recent campaign “helping men pull girls” which helped alienate half their audience (namely women).  They obviously had great intentions to undertake something cool and exciting on social media utilising app technology – however it seems to be a classic case of letting the technology rule the idea.

Even if your intention isn’t to run a ‘cool’ participative marketing campaign but to have a presence within social media, you still need to be familiar with your target audience.  Remove the word media from social media and you have social.  People using these channels generally do so to communicate with each other.  They align themselves with likeminded people and as a consequence, generally don’t like companies just plying them with promotional messages.  Brands need to earn trust and the right to have a place talking to people via social.  You need to be familiar to know what messages people want to receive, above all you must be open enough to reflect the audience wishes and feedback.

Fortune

Fortune covers two angles.  Participative marketing campaigns can be amplified if brands put budget behind them.  Social is not free.  You need to make the same investment in those campaigns as you would any other.  Don’t be so blinkered to imagine all promotion has to take place through social media.  People engaging with social media also consumer other media, the ObaWalkers Do Us A Flavourma campaign perfectly illustrates.  The campaign lived within social media, utilising strengths of various platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, however substantial investment was made in traditional channels to support this activity.

That being said, the investment doesn’t necessarily need to be in promotional activity.  Participative marketing can benefit from having a great (relevant) payoff for the participants.  A prize or even an ongoing cash amount for people submitting entries (Walkers – Do Us a Flavour).  This incentivises participants to think in detail about their response or become more creative.  The lure of some ‘fortune’ will also help spread word of mouth associated with your campaigns.

Fame

In 1968, Andy Warhol once famously created the phrase, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.”  This seems to be the undertone for the society we currently live in.  With the rise of reality TV shows and YouTube heroes, everybody does have their opportunity and indeed millions are positively striving for their shot at fame.  Just look at some of the hopefuls on XFactor.

With this in mind, if you can offer X Factor Logothe chance of fame as part of your social media strategy, no matter how small, their is a greater chance of success.  As with the familiarity section, the accolade has to be in tune with your audience.  There is no point providing the platform to be an Exhibitor in the Tate to a group of stereotypical football fans.  Neither would a DJ contest be of any interest to a group of traditional BBC Radio 4 listeners.

If you get it right, the element of fame can really engage with your audience.  Even if the fame is only restricted to a particular social network.  The YouTube phenonomen is a classic example of this.

Fun

As with most activity online, making it fun is a key consideration.  If you can entertain your audience you are more likely to gain the talkability factor.  A sense of fun adds an element of personality to a brand.  This does not necessarily mean the concept has to be funny, more just fun, engaging and entertaining to the audience.

Again, being in-tune with your audience is crucial.

Forwardability

If you have one or all the of the above elements cracked to a good level then you should have produced activity that has the potential to be forwarded.  Your presence needs to be in peoples’ e-mail boxes.  On their phones and referenced on their individual social media profiles.  Your need to be so current to the audience and reflect what they want that they are proud to be associated with the brand.  The audience will do the work for you.

Remember, get it wrong and they are just as likely to forward to their friends but paint a very negative and potentially damaging response.

The package

So this was an initial attempt at placing some theory behind social and participation marketing.  This is by no means exhaustive and I will hopefully come back from time to time to refine the concept of the 5 F’s.  I will also be looking at some case studies to critique and test my theory of the 5 F’s, so if you have any candidate campaigns or brands, please feel free to contact me.

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Monkey Sphere

 

monkey in marketing

 

 

 

 What on earth have monkeys and their brains got to do with Marketing? Hmm, absolutely nothing?!

Well as interlinked to marketing and advertising as sociology is, so is the monkey sphere. But what is the monkey sphere? The monkey sphere is a concept, some consider abstract, others think derived from science, that outlines how many people we can establish meaningful relationships with. Still not sure what this has to do with Marketing?

Well look at community sites. They are there literally to enable individuals to connect with one another. Facebook, MySpace and Bebo were literally set-up for people to meet, connect and speak to others. Twitter has in a way evolved to a similar realm, with people counting the number of followers they have.

The monkey sphere is a number that outlines how many people we can ‘genuinely’ connect with. Why is it called the monkey sphere?

 Scientists ran a number of tests to establish why monkey’s stayed in specific communities and seemed capable of only caring for certain other monkeys. In pursuit of the answer, they cut up so many monkey brains, that they could actually take a brain they had never seen before and from it they could accurately predict what size tribes that species of creature formed. Most monkeys operate in tribes of 50. But to test the scientists hypothesis a slightly larger brain was presented and they estimated the ideal group or society for this particular animal was about 148. The human number varies (due to variances in brain sizes), and if you research monkey sphere around the net, it is invariably rounded to 150.

front_monkeysphere

Essentially, similar to monkeys, this number is the critical number that humans can form meaningful relationships with. As a human you come into contact (either passively or actively) with hundreds of people every week. How many do you care about? And I mean, really care about. Very few! These feelings are normally reserved for family, friends and in some instances work colleagues. Very few brands have really connected with people and entered their monkey sphere. Some times brands can enter and then go equally as quickly. Others just click with some individuals and can do no wrong, no matter what (Apple?).

So for all the organisations grappling with social media or community marketing, just remember, the odds are very few people will actually really care about your organisation. Don’t enter the environment, thinking you have a god giving right to be there. Provide content and materials that the audience actually want. Communicate on their level. You may, just may enter their monkey sphere. But don’t get too down heartened if the base aren’t communicating with you day in, day out. It doesn’t mean you have failed, it just means you aren’t in their monkey sphere.

OK, so it was slightly off-topic, but interesting nonetheless.