Rich Clark Marketing

Opinions from Rich Clark one of the UK's leading Marketing Professionals


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England Football Sponsorship

This article originally appeared on my LinkedIn profile with the title “Its Coming Home” if we aren’t connected on LinkedIn feel free to add me here

As England qualified last year, in all fairness from a pretty poor qualifying group, for this year’s FIFA World Cup in Russia, few, if any football fans expected this success. When the groups were drawn, we were expected to qualify for the first knock-out stage but probably little beyond that.

The “tactical” defeat by a second string England side against a second string, albeit still very strong Belgium side, ensured they had an easier path to navigate in the knockout stages. However, as the team has progressed so have the emotions, so have the passions and so has the feel good factor around this little old country of England.

With political turmoil and ever growing confusion around Brexit, the fortunes of a little fancied football team are helping the country. Few would have planned, but the nation and business are more than happy to embrace this. As I write this, I am awaiting the France Vs Belgium game to see who our potential final (or 3rd place playoff) opponents will be).

So I take a non-fact based look at who I believe has done well from England’s unexpected performance.

The logical first port of call is to examine the official partners of The FA. If we progress to the final, I might even look at some of the unofficial brands that have made the most of the experience.

Vauxhall

First off we have Vauxhall, who are the closest of the FA partners to the relationship we used to have when I was at Nationwide. They have their names on the training kit, I assume they have access to players and they have rights to use the official badge and players in their marketing materials. Bizarrely though, the automotive brand seems to have failed to embrace either the success or even the fact they are a partner of the FA. Whilst it may difficult and costly for a larger company with rigid processes to adapt TV creative to respond to the current opportunity, they should be able to adapt press and could definitely make more of it on their social media. If you were to look at Vauxhall’s social media channels, even Facebook, the one they could adapt to location if they were worried about alienating people, there is no reference to football or England. The imaginative content the brand could have produced shows this is a huge missed opportunity and a bit of a shame.

Nike

As main kit suppliers Nike are embedded with the FA and fans alike. You can’t see England without seeing the famous tick. Nike’s potential issue in terms of really taking advantage of the current buzz is their global accounts and their stable of countries they are involved with. Nike actually supplies kit for three of the four semi-finalists, with only Belgium bucking the trend with their adidas kit. Nike is so in to its brand with amazing executions, that genuine football fans would forgive them and still consider them part of what was going on. They could still do a bit more in terms of content and tailoring their properties for the English market, but they do pretty well.

Buildbase

Now maybe I am not their target customer. OK. I am not the Buildbase target customer, but until I looked it up, I had no idea that they were a partner of The FA and haven’t seen them at all in conjunction with this England push. Even when looking at their social accounts, you would be forgiven for not realising they were so closely aligned. Apart from a quite poor game and some unimaginative posts the brand seems to have wasted its opportunity to engage and undoubted football audience. Perhaps you can move in their stores for football paraphernalia

Mars

Mars have been involved with the FA for some time and the are great at capitalising on their relationship. They do have the undoubted advantage of selling quite a few of their products and being able to put on pack promotions and messages that are in pretty much every supermarket, petrol station and convenience store in the England. Their ATL efforts clearly align them to the football team and there is no doubt of the connection. As England have progressed, it feels their ads are more regular which shows great ability to capitalise on the mood of the nation. Bizarrely, if there is a weakness in its armoury, again it is in content and social media, where its Mars football accounts have small following, infrequent posts and low engagement.

Lidl

After a successful partnership with Sainsbury over the years, it came as some surprise that Lidl was unveiled as its new partner. The Lidl TV ads were actually fun and engaging and really use humour and the human angle to captivate an audience. However in terms of retail execution, something was awry. Particularly as Sainsbury’s still seemed to have a volume of “official” England merchandise available in store. Its presence on content on both Twitter and Facebook appear strong, however Instagram feels the poor relation. Overall though it was a good showing from the German retailer.

Carlsberg

Carlsberg extended its long-standing relationship with the England football team. With other relationships in football the brand has genuinely smashed it again. A strong branded website and great content relevant to its audience. Again, the publishing of social could be stronger but assets are strong.

Lucozade Sport

With a reputation engrained in sports its not really a surprise that Lucozade have a good take on how to run a sports marketing initiative. Their on pack materials are limited but the content they have produced is strong and lives comfortably across all social channels. They have done good work with many influencers both football and non-football related. It was surprising that there wasn’t more native video built specifically for the platforms and for others to push out and share.

Overall, of the official partners I looked at their pushing of the association with the England team is mixed. Very few have really taken the tactical opportunity of the unexpected success. None of the brands, with the exception of Nike delivered a particularly strong presence in terms of social.

I feel Vauxhall who had the biggest right to do something was the biggest disappointment. So, if anybody from Vauxhall is reading this, get in touch.

The lesson for me from this exercise is one of how to tactically take advantage of an event (that may be unexpected). Also, how much potential there is in the realms of sponsorship and sports marketing, still out there in relation to social media. Now that gives me an idea…


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New Series of The Apprentice Starts Tuesday

Whilst writing about the new series of The Apprentice is hardly a normal topic for a Marketing blog, I make no apology for it.  For me The Apprentice is up there with the top programmes on TV.  Both from a creative point of view and the way they have made people understand that a career in commercial organisations need not be boring.

My main hope for this series of The Apprentice is that they have selected candidates that want to be on the show for business reasons, not to try to catapault themselves in to a mini-celebrity.  The likes of Saira Kahn, Ruth Badger and more recently Kate Walsh have been good candidates but seemingly as intent on celeb status than a job with Lord Sugar.

The challenges provide great tests of the candidates talent and commercial acumen, although they quite often focus a lot on sales.  The characters are often so far out in terms of how exagerated they become to achieve stand-out for the crowd, some end up becoming parodies of themselves.

People in my network of friends have often said I should enter The Apprentice as they believe I could do well.  Frankly I don’t think I could put up with some of the candidates and how they behave, so its probably best I stay away.

Anyway, the show starts on BBC 1, Tuesday at 9pm and the candidates have already been unveiled.  We have people from all walks of life including the usual suspects from Sales and Marketing Backgrounds. I for one will be glued to my set to see how the candidates shape up and will expect the losing project manager to go in the first episode.

One element of sadness is that Margaret left the team.  That isn’t a negative around Ms Brady (Peschosolidio), more an endorsement for Margaret.  You could tell both her and Nick had an honest working relationship with Lord Sugar and none of it was forced.  With Karen because she was added to the show it fills a little more ‘done for TV’.

That being said, I can’t wait to hear Lord Sugar say for the first time, You’re Fired!

Oh one other slight negative, I really don’t like the after show half as much now Adrian Chiles has left.


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Using Social Media in a B2B World

Without a doubt Social Media is a really important element of modern life.  Individuals use it to connect with friends, old acquaintances and even celebrities.  Organisations of all sizes are using the likes of Facebook to make contact with their customers.  This doesn’t appear to change, if anything Social Media is likely to play an increasingly prominent role, especially now that Google states it will use buzz as an influence in its ranking.

When I speak to friends who work in a B2B environment they often ask what can they use it for.  I am also asked the same question when I speak at conferences.

Despite the repeated questions on how should B2B organisations adopt Social Media a Bizreport study outlined some interesting and surprising statistics.  86% of B2B firms already have an active Social Media presence compared to only 82% of B2C companies.  However the same report suggests that those B2B firms aren’t making the most of their presence with 32% engaging with their base on a daily basis, compared to 52% of B2C companies.  This is backed up by the fact that 34% of B2B companies aren’t tracking their activity in any way either.

Gut instinct is the same as if I was in a B2C environment. Use the channels in the way they should be used and create approaches that are right and targeted to your audience. The key thing I would advise anybody to do first however is understand why your business should be in Social Media and what is your aim of being there?  Can you offer the audience something they can’t get elsewhere or provide them with a point of view they don’t easily get.

Once you have defined your sense of being (in Social Media terms) you should integrate it into both your overall business processes and your overall Marketing strategy.  The reason for doing this is to ensure it becomes a part of your everyday activity in your business, automatically enabling you to avoid the pitfall of engaging in the stats in the report.

Perhaps more importantly in B2B than in B2C you really need to define what each channel will be used for.  That being said this is still an important factor in B2C however there is also more of an overlap of channels for B2C.  Remember, just because all the buzz and scale is with the likes of Twitter, Facebook and YouTube you may decide that one or all of these channels are not suitable for your business.

A key part to any social media strategy is the reason for being.  Offer your customers something to engage with, provide a currency that will ensure they want to engage with your company. This will be different depending who your business is, what it does and your position in your sector and with your customers.

For example, if you are perceived as an expert in your field then your strategy will be completely different to if you are purely a distributor of kit.  We need to take one step back to the start of that sentence, the key part is how you are perceived by your customers, not how you perceive yourself.  You don’t need to undertake expensive brand studies just generally ask your customers some new questions, unless you already know the answers.

Obviously in a B2B environment customers are often as concerned by the commercial aspect so if you are in a position to offer something unique for those that engage with you via social media (voucher codes or free services) that could provide a boost to your numbers, however that alone will not necessarily help you achieve your goals unless its a continued programme of activity that provides real additional value.

The whole ethos of being an expert provides real social media gold.  What can you give to your customers that will help interaction and engagement.  A great example is to provide content they wouldn’t get elsewhere.  A builders merchant could provide HowTo guides for builders on ways to save money and time on specific projects such as building a conservatory.

A distributor of electrical components could provide a service to the end user but as an aid for their B2B customers.  The distributor could provide a mash-up of the UK map which is fully searchable and links to electricians in their area, with examples of their work and testimonials.  The distributor in theory could also create income from charging electricians to appear on their platform if scale was achieved.

IT training companies could really demonstrate their expertise by providing a community and forum on their own website where their trainers can answer delegates questions on site and in theory offer clinics at agreed dates to really give in-depth support to their delegates.  This would really add ongoing value to delegates and support them and their employers further in to the lifecycle.

These were just some basic ideas that could be adopted and across a number of sectors.  If you are in a B2B environment, feel free to make contact and I can see if I can devise something specific for you.  Also check out this B2B Social Media infographic


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Celebrity Tweeters

Celeb Tweeters

So based on a sample size of one (namely me) I thought I would produce a list of the celeb Tweeters that engage with a normal run of the mill member of the public like little old me.  Whilst I won’t vouch for the A-list calibre of the list, I will say they have all been or will be in the public eye.

Criteria for inclusion is simple.  A public figure must have Mentioned me (@mrrichclark) in a Tweet, followed me or DMed me – simple.  This list isn’t a popularity contest or self-promotion merely a little bit of fun.

Jason Manford –comedian and One Show presenter

 

 

Chantelle Houghton – Winner of Big Brother and Ultimate Big Brother finalist (account seems to have changed now)

Davina McCall – Big Brother host, hair dye enthusiast and annual fitness DVD lady

 

 

Suzi Perry – Gadget Show Presenter and Moto GP fanatic

Paddy McGuiness – legendary Bolton comedian andnow presenter of Take Me Out

Ortis Deley – Gadget Show presenter and former children’s TV presenter

 

 

Yoko Ono –the lady needs no introduction

Dawn Porter – general quirky TV presenter

Sarah Cawood – TV presenter, now on BBC’s flagship film show

Carol Vorderman –ridiculously intelligent TV presenter of Countdown fame

 

 

Michelle Dewberry – Winner of Alan Sugar’s The Apprentice

Angellica Bell – Former Children’s BBC presenter

Duchess – upcoming Girl Band

Mark Charnock – Marlon from hit soap Emmerdale

Bianca Gascoigne – Daughter of football legend Gazza, DJ and model

Rio Ferdinand – Manchester United and England defender

Reggie Yates – TV and Radio Presenter

 

 

 

3AM Girls – Infamous Gossip Columnists

Rob Brydon – Comedian and Writer

Matthew Cooke – BBC voice over

The Bratt – Rapper

Reese Williams – Emmerdale Actress

Jodie Prenger – Singer in musicals and TV personality

BlakTwang – Hip Hop star

Richard Clarke -Presenter on Capital FM

Jodie Marsh – Model

Andrea McLean – TV Presenter

Charlotte Hawkins – Sky News Sunrise Presenter

Aisleyne Horgan – Big Brother Contestant

Lucy Jones – Sony nominated Radio Presenter

Jen McGinlay – Radio Presenter

Richard Bacon – TV and Radio Presenter

 

 

 

 

Iain Lee – Comedian

Natalie Pinkham – Presenter


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Location, Location, Location

This isn’t a post as a homage to Phil Spencer and Kirstie Allsopp’s property show but more a view on one of the latest developments in online, location based Marketing.

From the rise of geo-targetting on Google. To the regional Tweets on Twitter to probably the fastest emerging elements, Facebook Places and of course FourSquare.  So some commentators question the long-term validity of these mediums as marketing channels. Others distrust the security. Some  however see these emerging channels as unique methods to undertake targetted activity of a stellar level.

In terms of geographical targeted advertising some channels are better than others.  The likes of Google has constantly refined and improved its offer in its core PPC offer but also with the introduction of LBC and within their display (content) network.  Facebook has placed substantial emphasis on developing its advertising platform and using the API there are numerous sophisticated targeting opportunities, not least geo-targetting.  Others, at present, are a lot less sophisticated. Twitter’s advertising platform(currently in its infancy)  is currently only open to a global audience, ensuring no matter how great your promotional message is, at present if your business is domiciled within a particular country, you will suffer unavoidable waste.  If Twitter’s ad platform is in its infancy then, others such as Foursquare, are at best babies or even yet to be conceived.

However, the paid for advertising component is only one thread we need to investigate.  The beauty of social media and the emerging opportunities are the organic methods of targetting.  These organic components are released by the channel owners and brands are actively encouraged to develop or promote on them, as long as it add value to the user base.  Twitter has a great site for developers and like Facebook they understand the benefit the developer community provides to their offer.  So enough of my ramble, what geo-targeting, geo-tagging, location based tools are out there at the moment?

Google Places

Formerly known as Google LBC (Local Business Centre) takes advantage of Googles open API on its map solution.  As a business owner you can simply upload your business with its address and pin it up to Google maps.  This is great, if like most people, your customers search for your locations on Google Maps.  It can also integrate with your PPC.  Great hygeine factor to include, but reliant on people knowing you already.

Google Geo-Targeted PPC

Google has moved a great distance in terms of its geo-targeting for PPC. Its relatively sophisticated PPC engine now allows you to target people in postcodes, towns or areas.  The best part of the latest enhancements is the fact that you can define a bespoke area by placing points on a map.

Facebook Places

Facebook Places is still at the beginning of its journey in the UK.  Whilst no advertising opportunities exist, plenty of organic opportunities are available to companies.  However your brand is much more likely to get referenced if you have a loyal following on Facebook.

FourSquare

This is one of the latest most talked about social applications. Very bascially it is a tool to ping people where you are at the moment, started out as used for places to eat but has quickly spread.  Not really sure it offers much differentiation from Facebook places, but it already has a decent level of uptake.

Twitter

Its only a matter of time before the sponsored elements of Twitter go regionalised.  The fact you can add a location to your tweets means it will go that way.  Then it is obvious targeting will become easier on the platform. At the moment, it is lagging a little behind the others.

What can you do?

So the question for marketeers has to be what can we use these tools for? Aside from the obvious distributing very regional messages, which is obviously of benefit there are other options.  You could make the use of these tools by your customers feel a little viral, offering incentives to them for becoming Mayor or first to mark your location a given number of times. 

You can also mark local events or openings via these mediums and minimise wastage on your promotions.

If you can operate social commerce, these mechanisms in the long-run could provide great opportunities for regional promotions, special events or even the selling of display or open-box items.  You could limit who the messages and promotions are distributed to.  This will not only minimise wastage and provide efficiencies on your effort, but it will reduce the likelihood of poor customer experience, when users from out of district see your promotion.

You should also reaserch the areas properly, there could be simple areas to target within established social media presences.  Think local student unions, Chamber of Commerce and Sports Clubs. These are users bought in to social and their particular interest. If you can get coverage with these communities, you are likely to succeed.

Remember these mediums allow you to provide ultra targeted (based on location) communications. However, remember you have to have a reason to be present. This can be slightly different if you are using the newer advertising based modules.


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Producing Content for Company Websites

What is Content?

One of the key topics that pop up with industry types, affiliates and agencies from an SEO, Social Media and Online PR stance is content.  Before I delve too deeply in to the subject matter, I think its important that I clarify what I mean by content.  This isn’t the standard information about your company.  It isn’t even about content around the products or services you offer, even though those areas are imperative.  In the context of  this post, I mean compelling content that people may want to read regardless of any affinity or lack of with your brand or their current interest in buying from you.

Why provide content?

Well it all depends what your objectives are.  For some organisations additional non-sales related content may be impractical or unworkable.  I can’t think of a single case where it won’t provide some form of benefit.  It’s just whether the scale of the benefit is worth the investment.

In the main, the reasons for providing content can be varied depending on your circumstances.  However you need to be clear of your objectives.

From my perspective the main reasons for providing content include:

Upside on SEO

Social Media SOV

Online PR outreach

Community Building

Providing an authority to your subject matter

Create buzz around your site

Upside on SEO

As well all know there are many black hat techniques to help radically increase your rankings within all of the major search engines (and Google is no exception).  However these techniques are ill-advised and can cause your organisation to be penalised or even delisted by the likes of Google and Bing.

It is also frowned upon to instigate link building campaigns by going out and buying lots of backlinks to artificially inflate your ranking.  Both of these techniques can also cost quite a lot.

So the best way to ensure improvement in search engine rankings is to create a good content plan.  The content should be devised to make it both interesting and relevant to your audience, whilst also providing genuine reasons forbloggers or sites to link to or to like, retweet etc in social networks.  Simple?

If your content strategy is devised purely for SEO reasons then you obviously need to know what terms people are searching on and where the gaps are in your keyword coverage.  You then need to engineer your plan to help build up potential linking on core terms.  The research is the critical element to this area, as you need to know how this element enhances or could potentially distract your overall SEO efforts.

My personal opinion, is that, if you develop content purely for SEO reasons, you are doing something wrong.

Tip 1 – You should provide worthwhile content that people want to read and get links on the merit of the content.  There is no problem in optimising the content for SEO reasons, as long as it doesn’t damage the content for the reader.

Social Media SOV

Your content is like a currency,if quality is good and matched with its frequency.  People will want to read what you produce and in term want to link to it and share with their friends.

Remember if your quality is poor or full of errors there is an equal likelihood that people will link or share your content but with negative container terms.  This doesn’t impact your SOV, in fact,it does increase it.  However it does effect the sentiment which effects both what your community or following think about you but also could impact your search rankings.

Tip 2– Provide simple methods to allow people to share your content.  Options such as Add This buttons or utilise tools such as Facebook Connect on your site

Online PR Outreach

Bloggers are an influential bunch.  But not all of them.  Remember it isn’t always about the bloggers with massive audiences that matter.  If you want reach and awareness then of course go for high-traffic blogs.  It isn’t always the best target however.  You need to create a robust outreach plan, as you would with journalists.  Understand why and how you contact bloggers and take the time to build relationships with them.

Understanding why you are reaching out to a blogger and what benefit you can provide to them is half the battle.  You also need to work out if your objective is reach or to inspire a change in people’s (not the bloggers) perception of your company and the content you produce.

Tip 3 – Personal relationships are important.  Don’t just send SEO friendly Press Releases, it isn’t good for you or the blogger

Community Building

Having a forum and a Facebook presence won’t give you a community.  The only reason you will create a community is by providing your members with currency, a reason to keep coming back.  Whether that is in the form of articles, forum topics or competitions, you have to give them something to get excited about.  Motivate them and influence them to join in or share.  As with the other areas research is important as is a deep understanding of what your community will want.

Why not get your community involved? They are much more likely to share and promote the content if they have been involved.

Post the content where they will want to receive it.  You can’t always put a snippet on your Facebook page and link through to your site, you have to be where they want to receive information.

Tip 4 – Fully research your area and ensure your community needs and motivations are answered.

Providing an authority to your subject matter

As long is your content is good, thorough, provides a point of view and above all creates something your average reader wouldn’t find you will begin to create an authority.   This point of view and authority will help improve your standing with your target audience.  They will start to trust what you are saying and you become the go-to site for your subject matter.  Perhaps more importantly for company sites, the visitor in terms becomes increasingly likely to buy from you as that trust builds.  This trust becomes a perceived brand value for the customer and will help the user make purchase decisions, regardless of channel.

Being an authority figure also ensures that you are referenced much more by the industry and in turn by people in their social networks or on their blogs.  All great SEO.

Tip 5 – If you want to create an authority, only people who genuinely know should write and make the pieces thorough.


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Footballers on Twitter

So as anybody who is reading this that knows me will testify, I am a huge football fan.  I am also quite active on Twitter although post mainly random nonsense.  As a result I thought I would compile a list of the footballers (thats soccer players to anybody from the states reading this) that are also on Twitter.  Whilst the list may not be exhaustive I will update it as I find more.

Let me know any I should add to the list

Rio Ferdinand @rioferdy5

Robbie Savage @RobbieSavage8

Kaka @RealKaka 

Landon Donovan @landondonovan

Dion Dublin @DionDublinsDube

Diego Forlan @DiegoForlan7

Izzy Iriekpen @Izzyiriekpen

Ronaldinho @10Ronaldinho

Cristiano Ronaldo @Cristiano

Darren Bent @DB11TT

Anton Ferdinand @anton_ferdinand

Wayne Routledge @WayneRoutledge

Cesc Fabregas @cesc4official

Xabi Alonso @XabiAlonso

Maurice Edu @MauriceEdu

DaMarcus Beasley @DaMarcusBeasley

Juan Pablo Angel @JUANPABLOANGEL

Ryan Babel @RyanBabel

Edgar Davids @esdavids