Rich Clark Marketing

Opinions from Rich Clark one of the UK's leading Marketing Professionals


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Is Online Display Advertising Dead?

Does Online Display Advertising Work?
Online display advertising regularly commands a high degree of concentration from online advertising professionals. It attracts a high proportion of many online advertising professionals time and in certain sectors, commands a high proportion of online advertising budgets.
As I have mentioned elsewhere in this blog, online is sometimes a victim of its own success. Because you can track almost anything, almost everything has to be completely accountable with no room for doubt or vagueness. Whilst this is powerful to help prove effectiveness, it is perhaps not the most effective way to manage integrated campaigns. After all, how long have advertisers spent millions on press and/or outdoor campaigns without being able to track effectiveness with any conviction.   For clarity, I am not saying these traditional channels don’t work, these can be effective but they need to be measured.
With the recession hanging over nearly the entire global economy, advertisers are evaluating all spend. If you are concentrating on purely ROI and not reach or frequency of message, online display often loses out.  There is often the argument that display is used to drive awareness or brand consideration, however how many advertisers actually measure this?  The other argument is that a different type of audience clicks on display ads, compared to other channels such as search or price comparisons. The latter is true, however as a recent study by Starcom, Tacoda and comScore illustrates that isn’t always a good thing.
The trio identified a group of individuals that they labelled “Natural Born Clickers”. Whilst this was a study in the US, it is more than likely similar here in the UK.
The study illustrates that these “Natural Born Clickers” represent c.6% of the online population. Disproportionally they account for 50% of all display ad clicks. This statistic alone illustrates that there is a small (yet not insignificant) proportion of the audience that skew display campaign results, this generally negates CTR and CPC as metrics. These audiences skew towards Internet users between the ages of 25-44 and households with a low to medium combined income. Heavy clickers behave very differently online than the typical Internet user, and while they spend four times more time online than non-clickers, their spending does not proportionately reflect this very heavy Internet usage. Whilst this audience also spends significantly more time online than the average user they are also more likely to visit auctions, gambling, and career sites.
The study obviously highlights that CTR (Click Through Rate) and CPC are not valid measurements for display advertising.  Whilst CPM is much maligned, because the impression does not necessarily mean the ad was seen, it is potentially more valid than CPC as a buying metric. In terms of brand building through display, if you are to buy on a CPM or CPC, I would suggest that you need to measure the impact on brand, awareness, consideration or actual shortlisting of your brand (dependent on your objectives).  If your primary focus is on sales at an efficient ROI, in most cases you should aim for CPA. This isn’t black and white as on a number of  occasions CPM can be more efficient than any other metric.  However, you should test different metrics on different channels.  To minimise risk, CPA is the best option.
Above all, remember anything is possible.  Don’t just think of display as banners or skyscrapers (although don’t ignore them).  Contextual, interactive ads are possible.  Sites like Facebook allow users to select or deselect the ads they show.  A site like MyDeco make the advertiser central to its contents and champions the advertiser.  You also have to be aware of some of the more interactive (intrusive) formats.  These often have high CTR, at times these are driven up by accidental clickers, sometimes trying to click off or close.  Cookies are often stored and your results are skewed to these formats if a sale is made on that PC.  I have always steered away from Pop-unders, subsites etc for this very reason.

MyDeco Example
The best lesson you can learn from this is, think differently.  Challenge your agency or the media partners you work with.  Above all, ensure you effectively de-dupe across all channels.  CPA can be fraught with issues on both post-impression and post-click sales, if you don’t de-dupe.  You won’t be able to evaluate if incremental sales were achieved as a consequence of your campaign.
Remember, I am not saying online display is dead.  To the contrary, just be careful with your metrics.  Ensure your tracking is robust and be think imaginatively with your placements and how you utilise the online opportunities.  Don’t just be another ME TOO.


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What are your Top TV ads?

See the full blog post – My Top 5 TV Ads


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Meerkat PPC – Confused?

Compare the Meerkat PPC – Confused?

 

OK so I have referenced that I think Compare the meerkat has to be one of the top TV ads of the moment. 

Compare the Market are obviously bidding on their own campaign in Google, but hats off to Confused.com – they are also bidding on the terms.  As their ad copy also features the word meerkat, their ad is normally higher in the Google rankings.  Whilst we can’t be sure of the conversion off such terms or the ROI it is a good nudge to the team at Compare the Market.  Maybe its a little jealousy as Confused.com ads aren’t particularly inspiring.

Confused bidding on Compare the Meerkats

So the fact Confused.com is bidding on Compare the Meerkat, is amusing and slightly annoying to Comparethemarket.com and their Comparethemeerkat.com campaign.  However notice the top ranking on natural search – hardly inspiring, this is something that should have been spotted by either the creative agency or Compare the market.

Call me old fashioned but Copyright 2009 BISL Limited is not the most engaging opening to a search description I have ever heard.


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Top 5 TV Ads

 

This is a list of my Top 5 favourite recent or current TV ads.This won’t feature the usual high-budget productions from Nike, Guinness or Coca Cola that you are used to seeing. For me the ads on this list off something different. Create engagement, impact or break the mould in their sector. 

1. Cadburys Dairy Milk

The latest series of ads are both creative and show a brave move from the Cadburys Head of Advertising. Rather than concentrating on the chocolate or people enjoying the flavours, Cadburys have created a new stance. They have managed to mix music with humour and creativity and not once does if feel like the brand is being bastardised. Hats off to Cadburys and their agency on these. I could have picked any of the recent series, the Gorilla is probably best known, however due to currency and sheer weirdness I have selected the two kids with the 80s watch and eyebrows.

2. Compare The Market

This ad is a fine example of where creativity takes a lead over the brand police. Obviously the outcome of a creative think tank, the agency that came up with this concept probably couldn’t believe their luck when their client bit. The ad lends itself to some neat viral activity with a spin off website comparing Meerkats. It also very simply gets the message of Compare the market across. Its use of the web to extend the campaign further is a fabulous example of using all channels effectively. The Meerkat with his simples slogan, could also become a great icon. Visit Compare the Meerkat – its worth a look

3. PG Tips

The series of ads featuring Johnny Vegas and Monkey from ITV Digital is a genius idea from the outset. However the latest ad which shows the over complex method of making a cup of tea. Including the milking of the cow and Vegas dancing with Monkey to the Stripper by David Rose. It takes on some classic cartoon style moments as well as classic slapstick. There is no other tea to beat PG

 4. T-Mobile

The first time this was aired was as an exclusive to channel 4. With over 2 minutes of footage from a ‘flash mob’ in Liverpool Street train station, London – it took a while for the pay-off to show that it was an ad for T-Mobile. What T-Mobile created here was a talking point, a stand-still moment that is very rare in advertising. The slimmed down versions are no less entertaining. Whether this is more than a good one-off remains to be seen. The snippet showing a bar-code is hardly inspirational. However as a piece of creative with standout, this is up there.

5. Virgin Atlantic

The ad works on a number of levels. Maybe it is a generation thing. Maybe it’s the visual clues to the 80s, Wimpey and Our Price. Maybe it’s the distinctive Frankie sound-track. Maybe it’s the vivid colours used on the cabin crews uniform and the photogrpahy in the background. Whatever the reason. The ad works – it simply and effectively puts Virgin’s birthday message across (something I wasn’t even aware of before the ads)

Nearly made it: 

 

Nationwide Building Society OK, so I may be a little biased here (having had a hand in the development of these ads). However, Nationwide broke the mould in terms of advertising Financial Services products. Rather than solely concentrating on the product and the potentially good rate, they took a brave step of moving to a situational approach. It focussed on exactly what Nationwide isn’t by introducing the bungling Bank Manager, played by Mark Benton. This combination of good story, good one liners and a pay off, mean it is without doubt worthy of a place. Also, it was a contributory factor to the downfall of those annoying Halifax/Howard ads.

 Barclaycard  The ad with the slide is another fine example of standout within a sector. Finance is slowly moving away from the stayed boring ads. Visually it stands out with good filmography and great visual clues to every day life (Scanning card in supermarket). The music is unusual (Let your love flow by The Bellamy Brothers) offering standout. The addition of a few funny elements such as getting stuck on the slide and the towel line, means this deserves a mention.

Love to hear your views.  Do my choices resonate with you?  Or do they jar with every sense you use?


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Integration Vs Imitation

One of the biggest areas of discussion between client-side traditional advertising professionals and their digital counterparts is campaign integration.

Brand police are obviously very sensitive and protective towards their brands.  They want to ensure consistency and maintain control.  Admiral qualities.

However, quite often their digital counterparts are passed on assets and told to make them work.  The digital teams are fully aware of their channels and generally understand what works and what doesn’t via the internet.

This isn’t a new debate.  Its just the mediums have changed.  The same discussions have and still happen on how to integrate TV with PoS and press.  However as those channels are more established the rules of engagement are generally well understood by marketeers and advertisers.

This isn’t the case with digital.  Traditional advertisers still need to be educated.  However the same discussion applies.  We are talking campaign ‘integration not imitation’.  Whilst millions may have been spent on TV ads or on sponsorship properties, there is no reason why you shouldn’t tweak the messages slightly for the channel.  You need to recognise the difference in mindset of the recipients of the message within each channel.

For arguments sake, a TV ad can be a very broadcast tool as you are trying to hit as many people as possible in a ‘sit-back’ medium.  However, text on an e-mail to your customer base may get the message across in a consistent way (follow same tone of voice, promote the same message, potentially use the same font) – however you know these people are engaged with your brand and you can talk with them on a more personal note.  This rule can be exaggerated again by using social networking as an example.  The text in your corporate brochure or on your press ad is very important and make take a serious tone – however you wouldn’t want to copy that on your Facebook page.

For me you have to ensure consistency is in place, campaign integration.  The look and feel need to be similar, the emotional output is similar and overall the message is the same.  However it doesn’t need to be identical, campaign imitation.  It doesn’t matter if the words are slightly different.  It doesn’t matter if the image is different due to the context as long as the overall brand isn’t effected.

Traditional advertisers need to step up and learn digital.  Digital advertisers need to push back on this and explain their rationale, but also explain the benefits this approach can have on the brand, rather than being precious about the channel.